George Washington Carver and the First How-to Manuals for America’s Farmers

Missouri native George Washington Carver is often well remembered as one of America’s greatest agriculture scientists. But he was also a leader in public outreach, writing bulletins that shared how-to information with farmers who hadn’t previously received such guidance. At the Missouri Botanical Garden, Carver’s legacy as an agriculture scientist is commemorated in the Carver…

Growing a Victory Garden

During World War I, Americans were called to help the war effort at home by growing their own vegetables in “Victory Gardens” that aimed to reduce pressure on the public food supply. And they answered that call, not once but twice. By World War II,  more than 20 million Victory Gardens were supplying Americans with…

Exploring Alaska on the Harriman Expedition

Imagine gathering America’s most intelligent and well-known scientists in topics like biology and botany, with support from gifted artists, photographers and technicians to do research in one geographic area. Good idea, right? Even today, that would be a challenging task. The Harriman Expedition to Alaska, led by wealthy railroad magnate Edward H. Harriman in 1899,…

White Redbud Has History at the Garden

Missouri’s native trees put on quite a show in spring, led by the fuchsia flush of the Eastern redbud (Cercis canadensis). This understory tree can be found in parks, home landscapes, and along roadsides throughout the state. The dense clusters of tiny pink blooms are a reminder that warmer weather and longer days have finally…

Cruise the Botanical Streets of St. Louis

You can learn a lot about St. Louis simply by reading the signs. Street signs that is. The city’s unique mix of Native American, French, and German influences are prominently posted on street corners in neighborhoods north, south, and everywhere in between. There are streets named after wives, daughters, lawyers, landowners, famous places, cultural icons,…

Plant Profile: Osage Orange

It’s one of the most eye-catching things you’ll ever see on the ground, but do you know the story behind it?

In the Footsteps of Humboldt

Alexander von Humboldt is one of the most influential people you’ve probably never heard of. Yet you’ve likely heard the name, whether you know it or not. His name adorns cities and schools, mountains and glaciers, and a dozen plants and animals including the Humboldt penguins at the St. Louis Zoo. When combined, there are…

St. Louis Plants

First opening its gates in 1859, the Missouri Botanical Garden has a rich history of connecting St. Louis with plants. But did you know St. Louis’ ties to plants also include multiple cultivars bearing its name? The following are stories of three cultivars linked to the Gateway to the West. Nymphaea ‘St. Louis’ Nymphaea ‘St….