New Plant Species Discovered by the Garden in 2021

Each year, the Missouri Botanical Garden’s Science and Conservation staff discover and name about 200 plant species new to science. That’s roughly 10 percent of all plant species discovered by scientists worldwide annually. Discovery is the first crucial step in plant conservation. Until a species is described, we cannot think about conservation status or ensure…

Grafting the Grape: The Rich History of Georgian Winemaking

Grafting the Grape: American Grapevine Rootstock in Missouri and the World is currently installed in the Stephen and Peter Sachs Museum, which is open for visitors Tuesday-Sunday, 11:30 a.m.–3:30 p.m.; please review current health and safety regulations for visitors. The exhibition content is available online through the Garden YouTube channel and the Museum Twitter account. Please check the Museum website for…

Lemurs of Madagascar

Lemurs are amazing animals—a diverse group of primates found only on the island of Madagascar. There are about 100 living species of lemur ranging in size from the tiny mouse lemur to the large and vocal indri. Nearly all of those species are threatened with extinction, mainly due to habitat loss and hunting, according to…

Record-Setting Monstera Among Newly Described Species

Monstera are well-known to many houseplant parents. The glossy evergreen leaves give off tropical vibes year-round, and the perforated leaves add an extra layer of interest. Species like Monstera deliciosa and M. adansonii are in-demand houseplants, along with cultivated varieties like the white-speckled ‘Thai Constellation.’ While appreciation is growing for these cultivated houseplants, so too…

Ynés Mexía: Botanical Groundbreaker

150,000—led to the discovery of dozens of new species and greatly expanded the botanical understanding of the plants of Mexico and parts of South America.

Trees for Lemurs and Lemurs for Trees

The Missouri Botanical Garden: the clue is in the name, really! We love plants – everything about them: we love unpacking their evolutionary relationships, we love to investigate how they mold themselves to their environments, we love discovering how best to propagate and grow them. But, most of all, we love simply reveling in their life-enhancing…

Plants of Japan

Japan has a rich cultural tradition of gardening, and the country is considered a global biodiversity hotspot. But you do not need to build an entire Japanese garden or start planning a trip to Japan to enjoy its diverse flora. Many thrive in our climate and make excellent additions to a St. Louis backyard. The…

Rare Tree Reveals First Flower

One of the world’s rarest trees, Karomia gigas, is flowering in the greenhouses of the Missouri Botanical Garden for the first time.

Spotlight on Science: Tariq Stevart

Tariq StevartAssociate Scientist, Africa and Madagascar Program When Tariq Stevart was around 10 years old, his grandfather took him on a trip to Switzerland, where they climbed mountains and discovered alpine flora, in particular orchids. It sparked a lifelong interest for Stevart, who grew up in Belgium and always admired the beautiful orchids of Europe….

The History of the Shamrock in Ireland (and How to Grow Your Own American Version)

Every March, many storefronts, restaurants, and homes turn green as Irish Americans celebrate their heritage through St. Patrick’s Day. Of course, many without Irish ancestry join in the celebration, too. During the St. Patrick’s season, the shamrock becomes a universal symbol of all things Irish. And rightfully so—the shamrock is the national plant of Ireland…

National Geographic Honors Garden Researcher for Conservation Work in Madagascar

Jeannie Raharimampionona has dedicated her life to conserving the flora of her native Madagascar. With more than half of plant species facing extinction in Madagascar, some may find the never-ending work to save them to be too daunting. But Raharimampionona can’t imagine doing anything else. “Sometimes I think of each plant species as a gorgeous,…