Controlling Common Insect Pests in Your Garden

Spring means new life and new beginnings, not only for plants but also for the insects that have evolved to eat them. Dealing with insect pests is best done when populations are small and before infestations get out of hand. As we here at the William T. Kemper Home Gardening Center look ahead to a busy growing season, we…

Chemical-Free Weed Control

Spring is upon us, and the signs of the changing seasons are all around: tulip leaves poking out of the soil, blooming magnolias, and weeds appearing in garden beds. This early in the season, these weeds seem innocuous enough, but soon they will be blooming and forming seed. Here are our tips for controlling unwanted…

Critically Endangered Agave pelona Blooms in Garden Greenhouses

It was late January when Jared Chauncey, Senior Horticulturist and arid plant expert at the Missouri Botanical Garden, noticed that something extraordinary was about to happen: an Agave pelona was sending up a flowering stalk. It was about to bloom. These plants live for decades before sending up the only bloom of their lifetime—they are…

Bioculture: Plants and People Interacting

People and plants have been sharing the planet for a very long time, and, through the ages, a great number of plants have become important to human culture. The Garden’s William L. Brown Center is thrilled to present a free talk series that focuses on that relationship. The series, called Bioculture: Plants and People Interacting,…

Virtual Orchid Show

Most years, the Missouri Botanical Garden Orchid Show offers visitors the chance to see the Garden’s expansive orchid collection while it is at its most dazzling—right now is the time of year that many orchids bloom. This year, the Orchid Show is on hold while construction of the new Jack C. Taylor Visitor Center is…

Pawpaws: America’s Forgotten Fruit

The arrival of September brings the beginning of apple-picking season, but apples aren’t the only fall fruit that’s ripening at this time of year. Here in Missouri, there’s a lesser-known seasonal treat that’s well-loved by those who have encountered it: the pawpaw fruit. The Pawpaw is Native to Missouri Asimina triloba, or pawpaw, is a…

A Visitor’s Guide to Japanese Festival

After a year off due to the COVID-19 pandemic, we couldn’t be more excited for Japanese Festival to return. Celebrating the history, culture, and people of Japan, the Japanese Festival at the Missouri Botanical Garden is one of the largest and oldest festivals of its kind in the United States. Since 1977, the Garden has…

Colocasia and Alocasia

Colocasia and Alocasia are two closely-related genera of herbaceous plants in the Araceae—or aroid—family native to the tropical rainforests of Southeast Asia. Commonly called “elephant ears,” these plants are cultivated around the world as ornamentals for their large, showy leaves, and some species are also grown for their edible, bulb-like corms. Colocasia and Alocasia in…

Scroll Through the Garden: September

September is the final month of summer, and its autumnal equinox ushers in the fall season. Take a scroll through the bright blooms of late summer and the first hints of fall color.

Fighting for the Future of Plants in Mauritius

Ten-thousand miles from home, soaked in the relentless downpour of the Mauritian rainy season, and splattered with the mud of mountain trails, Kayla Flamm, Jean Claude Sevathian, Becky Sucher, and Andrew Wyatt found themselves peering over the edge of a 500-foot waterfall in search of any hint of the delicate, pale blue flowers of the Nesocodon.