Garden News and Notes: January 2020

The Garden in Madagascar, 71 Homes to Install Solar Power through Garden Program, The Conservation of Fraser Firs, Why Our Scientists Are Studying Guano

Spotlight on Science: Adam Smith

Adam Smith, Assistant Scientist, Center for Conservation and Sustainable Development Studying climate change can be bleak, but there have been a couple times Garden Scientist Adam Smith has been truly shocked with the results of his studies. Smith, Assistant Scientist in the Center for Conservation and Sustainable Development (CCSD) at the Missouri Botanical Garden, uses…

Spotlight on Science: Dr. Robbie Hart

Dr. Robbie Hart Assistant Curator, High Elevation Ethnobotany and GLORIA Robbie Hart has always been a mountain man. No, he doesn’t sport a long beard and flannel apparel, but since Hart was a kid, he’s loved spending his days immersed in the unique ecosystems of the mountains. He grew up above Port Angeles, Washington, in…

Spotlight on Science: Dr. Jan Salick

A monthly look at the people behind plant science at the Missouri Botanical Garden Dr. Jan Salick Senior Curator of Ethnobotany, William L. Brown Center As an undergraduate at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, Jan Salick couldn’t decide on a major, so she took a temporary leave to figure it out while traveling the world. …

Shorter Future for Big Bluestem

Scientists at the Missouri Botanical Garden, Kansas State University, and Southern Illinois University–Carbondale have completed an analysis of the effects of climate change on a dominant and economically important grassland plant. Big Bluestem (Andropogon gerardii) is a common grass in natural and restored prairies that extend across the central Midwestern region (Kansas, Nebraska, Oklahoma, Missouri,…

A Baby Boom for Rare Legumes

A new study by partners from the Missouri Botanical Garden and Washington University concludes that populations of rare plants should be aggressively increased now, before the effects of climate change become more severe. Of all the effects brought on plants by a changing climate, drought is among the most potentially damaging. While much of the…

The Garden As A New, Modern Ark

Botanical gardens hold documented collections of living plants for the purposes of scientific research, conservation, display, and education. Serving as a botanical ark will always be at the core of institutions like the Missouri Botanical Garden. However, new times call for new measures. Plant species are going extinct at unprecedented rates today, and botanical gardens’…

Warm winter raises climate change questions

The U.S. just experienced its 6th-warmest winter, according to updated climate data from NOAA. And Missouri was one of 16 states that saw record warmth in February. The effects of this record warmth are on full display at the Missouri Botanical Garden. Magnolias, flowering cherry trees, and daffodils all sprung into bloom weeks ahead of…