Scroll Through the Garden: October

October is a month of kept promises. Just as we welcome the warmth and the green trees after months of cold, so we welcome the chill and fall foliage on the other end of summer weather. It was in the cooling nights of late August that we first sensed the coming of crisp fall days; the dusty leaves and early evenings of September told us that the brilliant reds and oranges of fall were on their way. October arrives at long last and delivers on these promises. Golden hickories and bright red maples light up the sky. Dahlias, chrysanthemums, and asters reach the peak of their bloom. Delicate roses continue to delight despite cold nights. At the Garden, this October saw the 60th birthday of the Climatron® and our annual Tree Week celebration, and as we head into November, the Japanese Garden is at the peak of its fall color. Take a Scroll Through the Garden with this look back at 30 of our favorite photos from October.

Teahouse Island was one of the first areas of the Garden to begin to show its fall color in early October. Photo by Cassidy Moody.

The green foliage of color still dominated the landscape at the beginning of the month, but there was already color creeping into the canopy. Photo by Cassidy Moody.

A blood flower blooms in front of the William T. Kemper Center for Home Gardening. This variety is called ‘Red Butterfly.’ Photo by Tom Incrocci.

On the Knolls, hybrid hickory trees, Carya x laneyi, put on a show with their brilliant gold leaves. Photo by Cassidy Moody.

This foliage doesn’t change gradually the way that most trees do. These hybrid hickories’ leaves change all at once, making them quite the sight to see. Photo by Cassidy Moody.

Aromatic asters brighten up a cloudy day. They are native to Missouri and a lovely fall display. Photo by Tom Incrocci.

This October, the Climatron turned 60. The conservatory was lit on October 1 in celebration of its birthday. Photo by Cassidy Moody.

Orchid, Oncidium

Summer turns to fall outdoors, but in the Climatron conservatory, the climate is always tropical. Here, an orchid blooms near the bamboo bridge. Photo by Cassidy Moody.

A Jaboticaba tree fruits and flowers in the Climatron. Jaboticabas are cauliflorous, meaning that their fruits and flowers grow straight out of their main branches rather than from new growth. Photo by Kristina Schall DeYong.

A maple tree in the Carver Garden, now turned a lovely orange color, begins to drop its leaves. Photo by Kristina Schall DeYong.

The Bank of America Family Vegetable Garden is still full of marigold blooms even as the vegetable plants are removed in preparation for winter. Photo by Tom Incrocci.

Anemones, or windflowers, have been flowering all month long and thrive in the chilly fall temperatures. This patch is blooming in the Boxwood Garden. Photo by Kristina Schall DeYong.

Sunlight streams through the foliage of a reddening ‘Full Moon’ Japanese Maple. Photo by Tom Incrocci.

Delicately pink chrysanthemums bloom in the Lehmann Rose Garden. This variety is called ‘Hillside Sheffield Pink.’ Photo by Tom Incrocci.

When fall arrives, you can see where the golden larch gets its name. This distinctive tree stands by the entrance to the Sachs Museum. Photo by Tom Incrocci.

Roses continue to bloom beautifully, always surprisingly sturdy in chilly weather. This variety, Rosa ‘Korfocgri’ SUMMER SUN, can be found in the Gladney Rose Garden. Photo by Tom Incrocci.

Leaves aren’t the only color to light up the landscape in fall time. Some plants, like this American holly tree, add vivid fruits to the seasonal display as well. Photo by Tom Incrocci.

In the Ottoman Garden, monkshood stands out among the oranges and reds of fall with its deep indigo blooms. Photo by Kristina Schall DeYong.

Each fall, a gorgeous collection of large chrysanthemums is on display in the Pring Dry Garden. Photo by Tom Incrocci.

Each fall, a gorgeous collection of large chrysanthemums is on display in the Pring Dry Garden. Photo by Tom Incrocci.

Each fall, a gorgeous collection of large chrysanthemums is on display in the Pring Dry Garden. Photo by Tom Incrocci.

As the month of October comes to a close, the trees in the Japanese Garden have reached their much-anticipated fall colors. We are expecting to see peak fall foliage through at least the first week of November. Photo by Kristina Schall DeYong.

Autumn is certainly apparent at the Zigzag Bridge, where a wide variety of trees and shrubs are changing for the season. Photo by Kristina Schall DeYong.

The Koi Bridge in the Japanese Garden is the perfect spot to pause and take in the changing landscape. Photo by Kristina Schall DeYong.

An abundance of dahlias make the Boxwood Garden a must-see on your next visit to the Garden. Photo by Kristina Schall DeYong.

It would be easy to mistake these chrysanthemums for daisies, and we wouldn’t blame you––they’re both in the Asteraceae plant family. But unlike daisies, these mums can tolerate the chilly fall weather and will hang on much later in the season. Photo by Tom Incrocci.

Gorgeous pink-and-yellow dahlias frame the pavilion at the head of the Boxwood Garden. Photo by Kristina Schall DeYong.

Bottlebrush buckeye turns a deep golden color in the fall. Take a moment to stop and let the color surround you as you make your way toward the Climatron. Photo by Kristina Schall DeYong.

A skeleton pops out of the blooms of a decorative mum in the Member Entry Court Garden fall and Halloween display. Photo by Tom Incrocci.

Skeletons clamber over a giant pumpkin and a bright array of whimsical gourds outside the Kemper Center for Home Gardening. Photo by Kristina Schall DeYong.

Kristina Schall DeYong
Digital Media Specialist

3 Comments Add yours

  1. Linda Yust says:

    This was an awesome digital stroll through St. Louis’ famous landmark!

  2. Shirley Pearce says:

    Thank you for the beautiful stroll through the garden!

  3. David Stephens says:

    Absolutely gorgeous.

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